Blog@SunTech: A discussion place about blood pressure measurement from Your BP Department.™

10 Ways to Reduce Your Blood Pressure without Medication

Dr pointing to a chalkboard with the text that reads Healthy Living

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 70 million American adults have high blood pressure—that’s 1 in every 3 adults. More alarming is that only about half (52%) of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control.

With those overwhelming numbers, it goes without saying that raising awareness about how to reduce hypertension – with or without medication – is critical.

Add a comment

Read more...

NIH Ends Sprint Study Early Stating Lower Blood Pressure Is Better

Heart Icon with an arrow leaning towards the high blood pressure side

How Low Should Blood Pressure Go?

When it comes to blood pressure guidelines, it’s a question cardiologists have puzzled over for years – just how low should blood pressure go? Well, according to articles released by nearly every major news outlet, including The New York Times, US News & World Report, FOX News and NBC News, federal health officials have declared they have “potentially lifesaving information” as a result of a recent major study – one that they are ending a year early because it has already conclusively answered this question.

Add a comment

Read more...

SunTech Vet20 “How To” Videos Have Arrived!

Dogs in a Box marked Fragile

Taking a blood pressure on a companion animal is very different than what you experience at the doctor’s office. You can’t tell a dog or cat to sit still and be quiet throughout the entire blood pressure measurement and actually expect it to happen. It’s more similar to trying to take an infant’s BP, except these wiggly patients have fur!

Add a comment

Read more...

Letting the Dust Settle on New Hypertension Guidelines

Nurse Drawing a heart

The April 2015 edition of Cardiology Today includes an interesting article – “New Hypertension Recommendations Anticipated in 2016” - stating that the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC), in collaboration with nine other medical societies, will be releasing new hypertension guidelines that will serve as an update to those released by the Seventh Joint National Committee (JNC 7) in 2003.

But, wait…weren’t updated guidelines already published back in 2013? As a matter of fact, they were!

Add a comment

Read more...

5 Tips for Preparing for a Cardiac Stress Test

Heart shaped stethoscope on a Cardiogram

For accuracy purposes, some diagnostic tests require a little preparation on your part. So, what do you need to do before you have a cardiac stress test? According to a recent publication by the Heart and Vascular Team at the Cleveland Clinic, the following tips are good to know before you step on the treadmill:

Add a comment

Read more...

Training Day — How to Measure Blood Pressure

Cartoon of a young male nurse pointing to a play button

No clinician would argue that blood pressure measurement is an important part of most patient consultations. But an increasing body of clinical evidence seems to indicate that improper blood pressure technique is fairly common.

In an effort to contribute to the conversation of proper blood pressure technique, we’ve created a clinical training video unlike any other. It’s entertaining and funny, but also grounded in the best practices supported by the American Heart Association and the latest clinical research.

If you enjoy watching, feel free to pass it along to any clinical professional who measures blood pressure. Share it! Tweet it! But at the very least…make sure you watch it!

Add a comment

Read more...

The Role of ABPM in Diagnosing Hypertension

Mature Man being consulted by a Physician

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Weighs In

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 67 million American adults (31%) have high blood pressure – that’s 1 out of every 3 adults. Depending upon the severity of the condition, typically diagnosed by in-office BP measurements, blood pressure medication and/or lifestyle modifications may be prescribed.

Although in-office BP measurements are typically used to diagnose hypertension, several studies have shown that other diagnostic options are far more reliable - specifically, the use of a 24-hour, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device (ABPM).

Add a comment

Read more...

Cardiac Stress Tests Help Predict the Future

Picture of Heart in a Crystal Ball being held by a hand.

Let’s be honest, a cardiac stress test can be just that – stressful! So how do physicians know when it’s appropriate to use this as a way to evaluate how well a patient’s heart is handling its workload? Well, it’s actually by considering a few different factors. Is the patient healthy enough to walk on a treadmill or bike on an ergometer? What if the patient presents healthy, yet there is a family history of heart disease? After evaluating those parameters, the question then becomes which type of stress test [see previous blog] should the patient actually undergo? The good news - there may now be further guidance for physicians when it comes to making this decision, specifically for males who are at risk.

Add a comment

Read more...

Mobile Healthcare Apps: Good or Bad?

Picture of Mobile Phone with Internet and Networking Concept Art

Healthcare Mobile Apps – there are certainly no shortage of them, and they cover just about every area of health care you can think of, including mobile blood pressure measurement. According to a recent online article published by Medical News Today, more than 500 million smartphone users worldwide will be using a health app within the next year. And the FDA has certainly taken notice of this growing trend, recently clarifying that only a very specific group of health apps are actually validated in accordance with their guidelines and regulated under their governance.

Add a comment

Read more...

When Physicians Should Be Present for Stress Testing

Picture of young woman on a treadmill performing a stress test under the supervision of a doctor.

When it comes to patient safety in stress labs, opinions run the gamut as to which clinicians actually need to be in the room during a cardiac stress test. Historically, it has been considered best practice to always have a physician present as those being tested are typically thought to be at risk of having some type of potential cardiovascular disease. And let’s face it – wouldn’t you want your doctor in the room in case something went wrong? But in today’s struggling economy, even stress labs are looking for ways to cut costs, and having a non-physician supervise a stress test if the patient is considered lower risk has become common practice.

Add a comment

Read more...

Subscribe to SunTech's Blog

Get the latest insights from the BP Measurement Experts.